J. Patrick Sutton Cases & Issues Blog
Deed restrictions

Deed restriction amendments that take away preexisting rights may not be enforceable

After Tarr v. Timberwood Park held that short-term rentals are allowed under common deed restrictions, HOA's and subdivision owners began amending deed restrictions to bar leasing and require mandatory, physical occupancy of homes for long terms. I get calls every week now from people who always had broad leasing rights who suddenly find that a majority of their neighbors have voted to take away their leasing rights and, even worse, mandate physical occupancy of homes. Is that allowed? Read on!Content may continue . . .

Unfair Attorney Fee Recovery Statute - Tex. Prop. Code § 5.006

Texas has a special law devoted to the recovery of attorney's fees in deed restriction litigation, and it is deeply flawed, unfair, and in my view, unconstitutional. The law, at Tex. Prop. Code § 5.006, states that the party who brings a lawsuit for breach of restrictive covenant can recover attorney's fees. The courts have interpreted this to mean that the homeowner who gets sued for breach of restrictive covenant (deed restriction) cannot recover attorney's fees even if he or she defeats the lawsuit. Unfair? You bet. What it does, in practice, is force someone who thinks they might get sued for breach of restrictive covenant to race to the courthouse and sue first. In that way, the person who thinks he or she may be a target can preserve an attorney-fee claim by using a special procedure (called "declaratory judgment").

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J. Patrick Sutton Cases & Issues Blog